Music – How to Market Your Beats

For the novice producer and creator of beats, marketing your sound is going to be one of the most difficult obstacles to overcome. This is mainly because the music industry is an old beast where the new and unique are not always welcomed with open arms.

The internet has certainly helped the new comers, however, providing a place for new blood to get the recognition they deserve. Still, marketing is tricky unless you can be as creative as you are with your beats.

Whether you make your own beats from scratch or you download already made beats and customize them, finding a fan base and a potential record label to listen to the finished product will have the same problem. Back in the 1980s and 1990s, musicians had to rely on the coveted “Lucky Break”. You performed each gig whether it was at a bar or club as if a representative from a record label was out in the crowd waiting to see if you had what it takes. While this is still a possibility, musicians are now encouraged to be more proactive with their approach.

Social networking sites like MySpace cater to artists of all forms understanding how hard it really is to make a name for oneself. Producers, hip hop artists, and really everyone is encouraged to use such arenas to its full advantage. It pays to use the internet and flood every possible area with news about a new beat you just made along with other information like show dates and times.

Often times, if you are downloading already made beats with the intention of customizing them later, these sites will have areas devoted to musicians. In these areas members of the site will be able to post their beats and other songs. This is a great opportunity to bring together musicians in one place so labels can easily browse through the selection to find what they want. This is, perhaps, the biggest innovation in marketing of recent date; the notion of bringing together artists in one place so big wigs can find them.

Even though you live, eat, and breath the Digital Age never underestimate the power of the spoken word. Establishing a strong fan base both online and offline will help legitimize your ability and talent. When you make it big it will be these first few fans that you can continue to rely on to help your record sales. Word of mouth will continue to be a great asset for the artist. When word of mouth spills over into the internet it is called viral marketing and has proven to be highly effective. Even though you have your own website and are a presence on those sites that offer downloadable beats you will still need to join every forum, group, and any where else that supports your projected fan base and peers that also make beats.

By having a visible face and a loud voice you will rise to the top and be noticed by labels. Don’t fool yourself into thinking that your first few beats will rocket you to stardom. It can take years for your sound to find a market. Many artists, no matter how talented, will feel discouraged by this fact, some will even give up. Just because the marketing campaign isn’t going as you like does not mean that you have just reason to give up. Be persistent in marketing and you will find that niche group which will then deliver you to fame.

The Music in Gossip Girl Episode 1 – “Summer Kind of Wonderful” Season 2 Premiere

Gossip Girls first episode of the season was filled with denial, lies and then a whole lot of coming clean– and so was the music. True to the shows musical past, the first episode of the second season, Summer, Kind of Wonderful, was an eclectic mix of indie and pop tracks beginning with Reverse of Shade by The Windupdeads.

Reverse of Shade runs through the recap of last year and plays into scenes of summer with several of the main characters. Just as the new scenes of summer begin with Nate and his new best friend locked together at the jaw, the track Buzzin from Shwayze belts on in the background. The lyrics fit the mood perfectly even as Serena passes Chuck on the beach with a set of topless beach bunnies.

Another catch all song in the show was Fell in Love Without You by Motion City Soundtrack, which does a good job of capturing the strife, heartache and denial that most of the characters are so obviously feeling over each other. The song plays through two of Chuck scenes, including his trip to the airport to welcome Blair home only to see her with another man. The show ends with the song as well when Dan and Serena make up and meet on the beach after the White Party.

The rest of the show takes on an upbeat that is reflected with faster music and more of a poppy beat. At the White Party, Google Me by Teyana Taylor plays in the background as everyone mingles. Later, when Nate needs help making Catherine jealous, Paparazzi by Lady GaGa fills the void.

Electronic Press Kits – Why Every Artist Needs One And How It Helps Boost Promotion And Sell Music

A salesman needs a business card. A job applicant needs a resume. In the same manner, an artist /musician/band needs an artist profile. In music industry circles, artist profiles are called press kits, and now in this digital day and age, an Electronic Press Kit or EPK would always come in handy. An EPK is every musician’s business card or resume, and what does it aim to do? The bottom line is to SELL. It is a vital promotional tool that could help sell music online.

If an artist is signed to a music distribution deal, an EPK is one of the resource materials used by music distribution aggregators to pitch to online music stores such as iTunes, Amazon, among others. For concert and event promoters/organizers, club and show venue booking agents, an artists’ EPK could make or break a potential gig or event booking. And for music fans seeking more information about an artist, an EPK could establish that connection that could eventually build-up to a fan base.

What makes for a great EPK?

1. Artist Information
a. Bio or Profile = a brief yet concise write-up about the artist and his/her music. Include some personal background about your hometown, your childhood, your hobbies, your musical influences, etc., but make sure to tie it up on how these background information affected or shaped you as an artist.

b. Music work experience = if you are an artist who has done gigs in clubs, malls, local events, or even done some audio recordings like compilation albums, EPs, digital tracks, and the like, be sure to include these in your general artist information.

2. Music Listening Station or Samples/Previews/Music Streaming Links
Online EPKs are mostly built-in with facilities to host music files that could be used as listening or preview stations. Take utmost advantage of this facility. This is your chance for your music to be heard. Upload a snippet or even a full version of your song/s. At the end of the day, your music is worth more than a thousand words.

In line with this, music streaming links are often positioned along with “buy” or “share” links. In a music distribution standpoint, these ‘buy’ links give your audiences direct access to where they can buy or download your music. Once a listener likes what they hear, you should be feeding their impulse to buy. In the same manner, ‘share’ links are of equal importance. Statistics have shown that peer recommendation also propels a fan’s buying instincts.

3. Photos
It’s a blatant reality that music sells partly because of imaging. With the dawn of the MTV, fans are always curious and eager to see how an artist looks like. Photos also serve a professional purpose of providing news write-ups, album reviews, blog features, and the like, an accompanying image of the artist.

4. Press Section or Links
Perhaps at one point or another you have been written about by a music blogger, or a music site reviewed your album or song. It is best to provide a link to the site where the write-up was published, and/or place a quote or a section of the article where the writer put in a good word about you and your music.

5. Gig Sked/Calendar of Events
It has been said that one gig leads to another. Keep your fans updated where, when, and what time they can catch your live shows. Also keeping a reference of your previous gigs show potential promoters and booking agents that you are an experienced and bankable live performer.